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The Fans’ Loyalty Should Not be Greater than the Owners’ Loyalty to Us

February 15, 2017 8 comments

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Happy Valentine’s Day.

 

Tomorrow, the Dodgers begin the spring training portion of the 2017 season. Lots has been said of the Dodgers improvement, some true, some not, and many expect the boys in blue to be among the top handful of teams in baseball this season – largely based on their high payroll and “depth.”

 

Before I get into that, I do want to say what I have tweeted several times this week – the lack of TV across the LA market for a 4th season is shameful. The Dodgers have been passed around from one bad owner to another since Peter O’Malley decided to sell the team to Fox. At the time, we fans knew it was quite a change – going from mom and pop ownership to a greedy Rupert Murdoch run corporation that only was interested in baseball in order to start a local sports network. Little did we realize, however, how bad it would get.

 

It’s debatable to some whether the skullduggery of Frank and Jamie McCourt is worse than the Guggenheim Partners time as owners, I would say different. When “Hall of Fame commissioner” Bud Selig handed the keys to the Dodgers kingdom to a cash poor Boston parking lot attendant, we knew it wasn’t good. As the McCourts rode high on the hog and drove the franchise into embarrassment, bouncing checks to staff, including Vin Scully, and cheaping out on security until people’s lives were in danger, we ultimately rebelled. Now, with Magic Johnson’s smiling (now absent) kisser conning us into believing everything was ok again, we sit staring at our blank TV screens, or MeTV re-runs of “Hogan’s Heroes” instead of our LA baseball team.

 

I would say from Fox to the McCourts to Guggenheim, LA Dodgers fans have been passed from one bad guardian to another, much like the Baudelaire children in the “Unfortunate Events” books and Netflix episodes. None of them have/had Dodgers tradition at the core of their belief system – all have been in it for profit motives purely. Yet, through generations now, Dodgers fans infight and quarrel and flaunt loyalty ownership doesn’t have to them. It’s quite amazing, the level of love and Stockholm Syndrome displayed since O’Malley sailed off into the sunset.

 

To me, it’s easy. Greed + no TV coverage = you lose my loyalty. You want it back? Focus on our needs, and that includes games on TV. Stealing Vin Scully’s final years was a heinous act. Lest anyone think Guggenheim is in no way like the McCourt era, think about that. Consider it when you get an overload of Charlie Steiner.

 

We will never get back what was taken from us, and considering the misdirection of the overly bloated narcissistic front office, it makes it hard to forgive. All of my life, and prior, the Dodgers were a team known for strong pitching. Over the years there were good offensive teams, and bad ones. The pitching was always key. Look through the Dodgers record books and recall the names. Behind the greats were many good ones, and those who held the fort, eating innings and supplying consistency that always kept the Dodgers in the thick of the National League race.

 

I don’t recall, prior to this administration, such a dismissal of pitching. The Fangraphs lovers among you will point to cobbled together stats and suggest this is the best pitching staff in baseball. I may not understand numbers like you pretend to (by reading some nerd’s analysis), all I have to base my opinion on is many decades of following baseball and end results. A team, especially a Dodgers team, should be built around pitching – starting and relief. It seems an afterthought or a “ho-hum” to the collective geniuses that run the Dodgers.

 

So, if you put together no TV, no Vin and very little pitching, it’s hard for me to get overly excited. There’s a reality that says the rotation is three guys, all of whom have concerns. Clayton Kershaw may be the best pitcher in baseball but after years of carrying the burden of the team on his back, his back gave out. Backs can flare up at any time, and while Kershaw may be healthy all of 2017, his sudden vulnerability at least merits a conversation.

 

Rich Hill has resurrected his career from independent league hurler (like his fellow well paid staff mate Scott Kazmir), but he’s also an older pitcher who has spent a lot of time on disabled lists across baseball. To assume his “Koufax-like curve” can be counted on for a full season is perhaps a stretch. Then comes Kenta Maeda.

 

I liked the signing of Maeda, but then I like the signing of most Asian players. Maeda is a gamer with good stuff, but he’s also Japanese and their seasons are shorter than those in the bigs, so his eventual tiring in 2016 should have been expected. He was gassed the last quarter of the season and of course in October, when we all closed our eyes and crossed our fingers as he went to the hill. He is slight of frame and while he could improve on his stamina and continue to evolve, he could also at least be considered someone who may have a solid first half and then vanish after that.

 

The rest of the rotation is more worrisome than the top three. Julio Urias is a talent touted as another Pedro Martinez. He sure can look good, but he’s also 20 and his young arm is not ready for a full season’s workload. In fact, I’d say given the way he was pushed in 2016, due to Andrew Friedman and Farhan Zaidi not considering reliable innings out of the rotation last year, he could even be a candidate for an injury due to overuse. I am not worried about Urias at the start of the season, but like Maeda, I am worried what happens as the year progresses. A baby pitcher should have his innings built up through the minors; Urias’ success and the front office’s desperation has rushed that timeline. Watching how they use him in 2017 should be interesting.

 

With Urias as the 4th starter (he should ideally be the 5th), it means a gaggle of curiosities will compete for the last spot. At this point most fans realize the signings of Kazmir and Brandon McCarthy were foolish ones by Friedman/Zaidi. They will compete with Hyun-Jin Ryu, former warrior with a shot shoulder, and assorted guys Friedman devotees will tell you are superstars in the making. No, they are just guys. The league is full of guys who fill roster spots, go up and down from the minors to the bigs and are not stars. Newsflash – not everyone who comes up through the Dodgers system will be a star. And another newsflash – every team has “depth” – it’s called a 40-man roster and minor league system. Living, breathing humans do not “depth” make.

 

For these reasons, the Dodgers rotation does not impress me. It’s possible they will have a decent first half, enabling Friedman/Zaidi to make a July deal for the 2nd half, but I’d argue, given what we see from most of their deals, and the fact the beef in the rotation should already have been added, who cares? As of today, the rotation is not ready for Oct play, which begs the question: “What have Friedman/Zaidi fixed since taking over?” I’d argue the deficiency the team had was the Oct part of the equation – that one more piece or two that could get the Dodgers over the hump. They already were making the playoffs for years. That isn’t enough. Friedman/Zaidi tinker, like mad scientists, but with the April through September part of the team, which, like I said, was in good enough shape before.

 

Friedman/Zaidi and their disciples would tell you it’s all about the regular season; the playoffs are all luck and a total crapshoot. That’s what Billy Beane has said, and the Moneyball record of World Series titles would bear that out. Small market executives, like Beane, like Friedman, like Zaidi, think like this because they must. They are traditionally hampered by lack of resources, financial most specifically, and need to assume getting to the dance is good enough. Perhaps, once in the post-season, they get lucky – it happens. Just not to Moneyball teams.

 

Guggenheim must have had their reasons for hiring Moneyball types to run the Dodgers – either hoping to save some money they could put into their own pockets (that’s not working, Friedman and Zaidi spend like gold-diggers out on the town), or because they were tipped off that the game has gone data and whiz kids who are all Ivy League are the ones you want in charge. I’m not dismissing data, it’s important (I recall loving Ross Porter’s constant stats that drove fans insane), but it doesn’t seem to apply to the work being done by Friedman, Zaidi and their crowded front office team.

 

Friedman inherited a windfall. He got a playoff team with a new rich ownership group and ripe farm system. A smarter man would have added the missing parts – perhaps a 3rd starter better than Brett Anderson – in order to go deeper into Oct. Instead, much like Paul DePodesta before them, a lot of tinkering, convoluted, needlessly complicated trades, signings of Cubans, reliance on unimpressive and often injured pitchers (overpaid), and other factors have led the team to no more Oct ready than before. I’d add, taking the long way around the mountain, creating needless busywork to get there.

 

At some point, perhaps luck will roll the Dodgers way and they will win. There IS talent on the roster. Some of the prospects in particular, holdovers from Ned Colletti and Logan White, look like this generation’s great Dodgers – Corey Seager, Joc Pederson, Julio Urias and Cody Bellinger, to name a few.

 

I just have no idea why fans continue to believe in a front office that shuffles pieces around, wastes money, skimps on money (hard to do both at the same time) and is rebuilding the regular season part of the team that was already a playoff contender, rather than the post-season part, which was the obvious weakness.

 

I chock it up to youth – easy to say, as I am old. I think baseball fans are not as diehard as they used to be, and youth comes with lack of perspective. As you get older, not only do you have to sometimes wake up in the night to pee, but you gain wisdom. As Louis C.K. famously mused in one of his routines, just by virtue of being on the planet longer than a young person, you generally come to know more. A young fan has the right idea – love their team, no matter what, but without a frame of reference, it’s easy to not really know what the fuck you are talking about. I have been young, and now I am old. Believe me, I know more now than I did when I was young.

 

I won’t even go into depth about the bullpen that was not improved at all over 2016, or the 2 guys for every position approach in the lineup that could work – if rosters are expanded to 35. A new season is upon is, so don’t let me burst your bubble. I will say, perhaps don’t be gullible. Keep your eyes open and your head up. Call “bullshit” when you see it. And yes, you should be very angry that for a 4th season, games are not on TV across all of Los Angeles. I would suggest you don’t pay for games, or McCourt’s expensive parking. If they won’t televise the games, listen on the radio, or just read the box scores the next day. If they don’t care enough about you, you shouldn’t care so much about them. Guggenheim is in it for the money, just as Fox and the McCourts were. The team has not been to the World Series since 1988, and that was a fluke. The rot had set in after the 1981 championship and the greats from the 70s teams moved on.

 

We are owed more than this. The fans’ loyalty should not be greater than the owners’ loyalty to us. Bickering on Twitter can be amusing, but it does not hold the owners accountable. Demand more and if they don’t give it, consider what else you want from life. Maybe it’s going to the beach, catching the latest superhero movie in the theater or just spending more time with family and friends. For me, if a group of smarties can’t figure out your rotation needs reliable innings and your bullpen should be several guys deep at the back, you don’t deserve my respect. If the games aren’t even available to watch, why should I care?

 

Here’s to another season of Dodgers baseball. Let’s see what happens. Have a Happy Valentine’s Day, everybody.

The Slow Boat is Painted Dodger Blue

January 27, 2017 2 comments

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I hope everyone is doing well and surviving the election craziness with the post-election craziness. I decided, to lighten the mood, I would put together a few thoughts on the Dodgers recent moves and non-moves, for anyone who cares. If you disagree, hate me or are merely stupefied, feel free to move on to another blog. My feelings won’t be hurt. With that said, on with the show.

So Fangraphs came out with their usual prediction of Dodgers superiority. Gee, I wonder why geeks obsessed with Saber data would keep picking a team with a brain- (uggh) trust full of geeks obsessed with Saber data. Let me think about that for a moment. Ok, forget it.

The source is as suspect as you would think. If you agree with the obsession with data vs. reality, that’s all well and good. You are entitled to your opinion, and I mine. As hosts of one of the MLB Network Radio shows said the other day, Fangraphs has their opinions and they believe the Dodgers are the best team in baseball but unfortunately in reality games are not played on spreadsheets and real injuries and likely DL stints do matter. They said the Cubs don’t have these concerns, the Dodgers do. I’d also add, no matter what data you are looking at, you are either high or dumb to assume the Dodgers current pitching staff is championship quality.

I had a little back and forth with some folks recently who disagree and hold Fangraphs up as a Scientologist holds up L. Ron Hubbard’s work, and as you can imagine, that went nowhere. They insisted that “every analyst agrees” that the Dodgers are better than the Cubs and the favorite to win it all. I believe this was the same case made last year, but my main point of contention is that I listen to pretty much every show on MLB Network Radio, at some point during a week, and I have yet to hear anyone “agree” with Fangraphs assessment. In fact, I hear the opposite.

I hear a lot of questioning why Andrew Friedman and Farhan Zaidi would deal the same blue chip they planned for “baseball’s best second baseman”, Brian Dozier, in a deal for Logan Forsythe. As I’ve pointed out, the Dodgers had Dee Gordon, then had Howie Kendrick, then had José Peraza, and then Howie again and still found a way to have no second baseman, necessitating moving José De León for one.

I guess one could argue they solved all their problems if they added Dozier or even Ian Kinsler. But is it the same marked improvement getting Forsythe, a 30-year-old journeyman with a .255 career average and some question about his glove?

This is not to bash Forsythe, who I can see being an upgrade over Chase Utley and that bum who hit .190 but has nude photos apparently of the front office and therefore keeps making the roster, but is it worth passing on three guys we had and dealing a prospect that could have come in handy at some point either for the rotation or another deal – to get Forsythe?

Someone I heard referred to Forsythe as a kid. Umm, 30 is not a kid. In fact this morning the GM show on MLB Network Radio mocked how genius Tampa’s GM was to turn a 30 year old second baseman into an elite pitching prospect, age 24.

I am of the opinion, and I’ve said it many times, prospects are currency. This discussion is not about holding onto prospects, De León or most any other. I understand that a farm should ideally cultivate future big leaguers for your roster, as well as be used to deal for parts you might need. Holding onto every prospect is not to be applauded, it’s foolish. So a problem I have with the Dodgers front office is taking the slow boat in everything they do. Keep what you want, deal what you don’t. Surely even the Dodgers front office understands not each prospect will be a superstar. But perhaps, just maybe, you could deal some of them for useful parts – before their value is gone.

I have no real problem with dealing De León for Forsythe and again, suspect it will be some improvement over the mess at second base last season. That said, I don’t know if one can say it’s improvement over Dee, Peraza or even Howie (and in Howie’s defense, I say that meaning the longtime second base fixture Howie, not the utility fielding occasional player Friedman created last year).

My issue, or better, comment is that as always, the Dodgers seem to take the long route to everything. A guy like Theo Epstein comes in, with many fewer resources than Friedman inherited, and gets to work fast. Within a few years the team is completely made over and winning a championship. It’s not the time only, it’s the approach. Problems are fixed. With the Dodgers, it’s always breaking down what’s unnecessary to break down and trying something new. Money that can be spent on proven big leaguers instead paid to Cuban prospects. Aces dealt. Injury marred pitchers or AAAA nobodies acquired. It all just seems so unnecessarily exhausting.

I suspect if Theo had Dee, he would have kept him. If he felt Dee was a trade high candidate, and somehow he got Peraza, or wanted Howie, I think he would have done that. Friedman and his merry men had to go through 5-6 players to settle on Forsythe – the optimal word here is settle. They hoped to land Dozier, after all.

Again, no offense made to Forsythe, I suspect he will be a decent enough part, not spectacular, but decent. But it is terribly humorous (and sad) to see Friedman apologists spinning this as a genius move. They too wanted Dozier. Friedman made it seem like Dozier (he of the cold streaks that last a month) was the solution. The welcome mat was out, and then Forsythe is acquired. Not for less, mind you, but for the same prospect Dozier was targeted for.

The genius comedy comes from the spin then going to how De León wasn’t that good anyway. I have said many times that scouts have claimed De León was not the Pedro Martinez type many had crowed he was, but perhaps eventually a middle of the rotation starter. No one listened. Now when De León is dealt for Forsythe (why must it always be Tampa, by the way? And Oakland. They made a minor deal with Oakland this week as well – so embarrassing), the story is rewritten that Forsythe is one of the best players ever and De León was nothing special. Ho ho ho

So for whatever it’s worth, the Dodgers infield looks pretty much set. It’s a good infield – there, I said it. It’s got a superstar (Seager) and useful parts. The great depth falls off fast if anything happens to Turner or Forsythe but such is life. I would say the Dodgers infield is not an issue anymore, unless you start wondering about speed. The team’s foot speed and athleticism are still lacking, but then, Sabermetrics doesn’t care about that.

I am of the opinion the Dodgers are marginally better than they were in October, thanks to this trade. I was not impressed with the winter up until now, and I’m still not sure I can say I’m impressed. But, doing something more than retaining your own free-agents, is a start. I would temper anticipation by reminding loyalists that the division has improved and the cake walk the team enjoyed in the West last year might be harder to repeat. So, the question is – has enough been done to repeat as Western division champs, or go all the way, if such ideas are in your head.

I’d say the West is a dogfight with the Dodgers having a chance based mostly on the health of the rotation. The Giants, if I had to guess, look like frontrunners. The Rockies look interesting to. And at some point the Diamondbacks might get their act together.

I think the Dodgers lineup, depending what configuration they use in the outfield, is serviceable. If Yasiel Puig could ever get it together, or a real right-handed power bat in the outfielder were added via trade, I’d be a bigger believer. There are good parts, and some question marks. No one knows what the three outfield spots will look like, or how many outfielders Friedman will run out there to fill those three spots. Twelve?

I’m still a firm believer in things like speed (absent), health (absent) and a deep pitching staff (likely absent). I think you win series in October by lining up well with your competition and what we witnessed last October was hard to watch. I’m not used to seeing starters hoping to “gut their way” through three innings. I’m not used to a bullpen one deep (ok, two – but Blanton likely won’t come back, and his October performance sadly was his lowlight for the year).

I think when you put together a pitching staff you need to think foremost about innings. How many innings can I count on my starters for? If you have a bunch of injured pitchers and potential DL stints, it’s a huge problem. It means your day’s start is in question, as are the games after it, since you likely taxed your pen to make up for the innings your injured starter could not go. i.e. for every suspect member of your rotation, it costs 2-3 days afterward as well. So if you have 2-3 suspect starters, you likely will always be running on fumes. This was the case with the 2016 Dodgers and their spent bullpen that was asked to do too much in October.

You would think the lesson would be learned and a few horses were added to the rotation and a few stoppers to the back of the pen, but it’s virtually the same group we saw last season. Brandon Morrow was brought in on a minor league deal, but he’s just more proof to my point. It is only the end of January, so who knows, perhaps a trick is up Friedman’s sleeve. If so, I’d still say why does he always have to go the long way? Theo certainly wouldn’t.

That’s all I have for now. To summarize – Logan Forsythe may be a fine person and a decent second baseman. He certainly helps compared to what was at second most of last season. That said, as a Dodgers fan you had three answers already around and teased with a bigger fish and ended up with a 30 year old Tampa Ray and it cost you one of the top prospects in the organization. Was it worth it? Only time will tell. I will simply say the dancing around and shuffling of musical chairs was clearly unnecessary. A smarter front office wouldn’t have chosen this route.

I will also remind that this isn’t about holding onto prospects. Some of course you choose and hang onto for dear life – Seager is one, and Bellinger looks to be another. Every prospect a future superstar for your team? Only in some fantasy world. If you pick the guys you want and deal some others for needs, that’s ok. I’d argue that for all the credit he gets as someone holding onto prospects (mostly chosen and developed under Logan White and Ned Colletti), he did deal three to Oakland in July and another to Tampa this week. The net haul is the right to sign Rich Hill for a lot of money and Logan Forsythe. Not sure that’s exactly how you best use this important currency.

Another funny thing from the debate I had the other day. Someone was telling me how De León wasn’t that good anyway and luckily we have Grant Holmes, who will be much better. I had to break it to the guy that Holmes might be better, but he will be better in Oakland.

The final point of comedy I will share this Friday afternoon is a CBS Sports article I saw yesterday, again saying how the Dodgers are better than the Cubs. The article was very firm in that the Dodgers have everything the Cubs had and more and that Friedman and the front office are geniuses. Wow, something other than Fangraphs, saying the exact same thing.

As I am rather skeptical of such rhetoric, I did a quick Google search and found the author (Jonah Keri) of the CBS Sports article had written a book. The topic? What a genius Friedman is and how he transformed the Tampa Rays. Again, consider the source. I have not in all honesty heard such praise on the Dodgers winter or the Dodgers unseating the Cubs anywhere else. I listen to MLB Network Radio fairly regularly, read what the known baseball writers say, etc. but I am not hearing it.

Can the Dodgers win? Well, it’s been three decades and the team does have some good players, so sure, maybe. Would I say they are a favorite? Even in their own division? Would I say they are better than the Cubs? The Indians? The Red Sox? No, I couldn’t say that. They are the same team they were in October, with a new second baseman and a few hail marys added as “depth.” I’d say losing Blanton from the pen and not really replacing him makes it arguably a net negative.

Let’s see what else these guys do. It just shouldn’t take this long. Their route is very unnecessary, which tells me they are either extremely arrogant or clueless. You decide.

One Last Therapy Session for 2016

December 23, 2016 5 comments

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‘Tis the eve before Christmas eve so why not talk a little Dodgers? It’s been an important yet overall uneventful off-season for the guys who wear Dodger blue. Important because someone high up the food chain, likely Mark Walter again, told the dueling dummies of Friedman and Zaidi and their gaggle of geniuses they better keep Kenley Jansen and Justin Turner or not only would the club not have a real shot vs. a closer-added Giants team, but worse, the fans might not show up for the higher ticket, parking and concessions prices. While all thoughts are of a magical 2018, Guggenheim still wants to squeeze every cent out of hopeful/delusional Dodgers fans. That $8B ($6B in profit after paying the blue blood con man) TV deal is hardly enough for rich capitalists. So, after risking losing both Kenley and the ginger haired ewok to other teams, Friedman and Zaidi “came to their senses” and signed the pair for market value – i.e. what they should have and could have paid in Oct. Interesting how baseball works.

With the important out of the way, we are back to hearing how the Dodgers are “in” on every big name, without anything to show for it. After July’s dance around Chris Sale and Ryan Braun, now the music has changed to Brian Dozier, who also is getting his tires kicked by the Giants. While Dozier would be a huge offensive shot in the arm and help answer the void Friedman and Zaidi created vs. left-handed pitching, I’m not a huge fan. That said, if the Giants add him plus their new closer, it’s curtains for LA, unless they switch course and land Ian Kinsler.

Dozier, who I had on fantasy, dropped when he was struggling below .200 for a long period of time and then grabbed when I spied he was coming out of his long funk, is definitely a guy you’d be “buying high” on. Is he the offensive beast we saw in the second half, or the guy who takes months off? I say he’s the ideal Friedman and Zaidi feast or famine hitter. He’d help a lot, but is he the best fit? I don’t think so. Better fits were Dee Gordon and Jose Peraza, or César Hernández of the Phillies. I’m of the antiquated opinion a speedy lead-off guy would help more than another swing for the fences type. Of course, I’d also add a legit outfield bat to help fulfill that dearth of production from the right side of the plate, be it Braun (who is crucified for Dodgers fans for cheating the year our guy likely was cheating) or some other run producing bat.

Ian Kinsler would be a much bigger asset, in my opinion, to Dozier, but he comes with his own set of concerns. While a pure hitter in the sense of Corey Seager and Adrian Gonzalez, turner is 34 and would probably insist on a contract extension, considering his deal ends after 2017 (with an option for 2018) and the blue are on his no-trade list. I guess it depends how much Friedman and Zaidi want to “win now” and how much they believe in Willie Calhoun. For the record, I don’t think Friedman and Zaidi care about winning now – they firmly are planning for all their prospects to become stars. The “win now” thing is coming from the top, and like I said, only then to keep the stadium full. One more for the record, not to say Calhoun won’t be great someday, but right now he’s a kid who hit. 254 at AA, so not quite ready for serious conversations, not to mention a left-handed bat.

I’d say finding two bats from the right side should be a big priority that shouldn’t wait until spring training, but knowing the way the Moneyballers operate, we might not see anything substantial until then. I’d say if you could get that César Hernández type and add a solid bat to replace Yasiel Puig in the outfield, the offense is in a good place. If they add Dozier, I’d still look for a bat for the outfield, as Dozier is fully capable of disappearing for weeks, months, at a time.

You should think how a lineup is perceived by an opposing team. The more “scary” guys you have, the harder it is for them to plan against. i.e. Kinsler a lot better and scarier than Dozier, unless Dozier is in a hot streak. Kinsler will keep teams honest. If you have Seager, Turner and Adrian and then add Kinsler, that’s four bats capable of getting a hit most of the time. Braun, like him or not, is the same way. In my experience, the more “scary” guys you add, the better your chances are, and the harder it is for opposing teams to pitch to. If you have a lot of .240 (or below) types with 100+ strikeouts, much easier.

Beyond that, I’d say the Dodgers need a real #2 starting pitcher but I guess that can wait until July. Rich Hill, they believe, is that #2, but like Scott Kazmir, a guy who was pitching in independent baseball not long ago and you end up there for a reason. Hill is not a #2. On his best day, he adds a smart arm that deepens your staff, but in no reality is he capable of stepping up in a big way when the World Series is on the line. I wouldn’t consider him an anchor anyway, some might disagree. To them, I’d say go check his career and his track record of injuries.

So, the rotation is what it is and likely is hopeful on magic and prayer, just like last year. Perhaps in July, when fighting for the West lead, or more likely the NL wildcard, a team will have dropped out and Friedman and Zaidi can trade off some of the prospects they cling to like gold. Prepare for a lot of mix and match like 2016 in the meantime – fun!

That leaves the pen, which obviously is much better with Kenley being back. That said, last year it was overworked due to the 3-5 inning starts regularly out of an ill-prepared pitching rotation. I don’t see it being any different in 2017, even if they retain Joe Blanton. And I would look to keep Blanton, and add another setup man. Friedman and Zaidi must have noticed the game has changed and while they assume starting pitching doesn’t matter, you’d assume they’d realize a killer pen does. It was evident in Oct. The Dodgers are innings short in the rotation and one deep at the back end of the pen. You need to be 3-4 deep, so thinking Pedro Báez and the other meatheads Friedman and Zaidi have accumulated meet that criteria, would be plain dumb.

The idea is to shorten games, and the Dodgers current crop of relievers are interchangeable mid innings types. I don’t see that “scary” factor that is also required in your rotation and bullpen, as well as your lineup. I doubt Bruce Bochy, Joe Maddon and other managers panic when they see anyone beside Kenley throwing in the Dodgers pen. Ideally, especially when your payroll is over $250M, you have quality and “scary” out there. So, again in my most humble opinion, the Dodgers should think of that. Back end of the pen needs to be deeper, the current mix isn’t going to cut it.

I guess I will leave you there. I hope we don’t see 2016 redux next season. If any Dodger fan is thrilled just because Kenley and Turner are back, remember, this team wasn’t good enough to win, and I’d say lucky as hell to have gotten as far as they did. The idea, if you look around baseball during this Hot Stove season, is to improve. The Dodgers have not improved. The rotation is still spotty, the lineup can’t hit left-handers, the pen is one deep, etc. There is work to be done if the Dodgers want to move forward. The Giants, again, have moved forward. The good teams are acquiring pieces to set them up for deep runs. The Dodgers have been smart to keep two key pieces, but are no better now than they were on October 22nd. That’s the night they lost game 6 in Chicago, if you weren’t sure.

Plenty of time to fix the issues that need to be fixed, so I’m just a voice of reason. What is the goal for 2017? Filling the parking lot and stadium or getting back to the NLCS, and go further? We shall see, we shall see.

Have a very Merry Christmas; Happy Hanukkah; lovely Kwanzaa and safe and sane (haha, good luck!) New Year. 29 years and counting.

Dodgers Fans Getting the Team They Deserve

February 28, 2016 9 comments

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In a few days spring baseball will start in Arizona and Florida. As a longtime Dodgers fan, I am still not used to the Dodgers playing in the desert and not Vero Beach, Florida. I sense the majority of fans like the change; just a road trip away and all that but as everyone knows, I’m an old curmudgeon and like things the way they were. Major League Baseball is not enjoyable as it once was, with fans strangely concerned with the owners’ profit line and micro focused on data. I recall not that terribly long ago when a regular complaint from Dodgers fans was how Ross Porter was awful because he was so obsessed with statistics, giving them all the time and apparently boring listeners with such minutia. I was – and still am – a Ross Porter fan, and I think when his approach was unique, it was a welcome change from every other announcer. Now, with everyone so concerned with obscure numbers and acronyms, it’s a lot less fun.

The world of social media has done much to destroy the world, pulling people apart, having us bicker, more than connect one another. Baseball fans are as abysmal online as political debaters or Kardashian/Jenner commentators. It’s to the point I sense Twitter, once a neat drive by site for information and quick comments, is dying a welcome death. I will gladly surrender my little part of the Internet if the whole thing gets shut down. Years back it started to strike me as strange that supposed fans of a given team could fight like cats and dogs with other fans of the same team. Back then it was baseball message boards, most long since dead. I would make comments about the then current Dodgers team and get attacked angrily for liking certain players, and not agreeing about others. It went well beyond healthy debate. Nowadays, it’s the norm. If you don’t spew the data and suckle at the teat of the owners, you are branded a hater and attacked en mass by a gang of faceless, anonymous bullies. It’s very unhealthy, so I take frequent breaks. Only my love of baseball, and a lifetime love affair with the Dodgers, keeps me returning. But as I’ve stated time and again, the Dodgers are no longer the Dodgers. They are a team that wears crisp white and blue and occasionally makes mention of something familiar from the past – Jackie Robinson, Sandy Koufax, Fernando Valenzuela, etc. – but in no way, shape or form resembles the teams those players went to battle for.

Nowadays the Dodgers are what they have been for decades, a shell of their former self. Various owners have come along and abused the fans and the great brand and most of the way the turnstiles have kept churning money into ownership’s pockets. If you criticize the direction of the organization, which is now three decades into mediocrity, you are bullied and told you are not a fan. It’s a sickness, a perversion that is hard to understand. Why would fans identify more with owners who come, reap great profits, then leave, over their own self interests of seeing a great team win a championship for them? I have no explanation. I have used the term Stockholm Syndrome over the years to define this identification with the one percent who deprives them of happiness, but that doesn’t seem to sink in. I guess the term is out of vogue and unknown to younger people who just root for laundry, as Jerry Seinfeld used to say. Jerry too is probably too antiquated a reference for fans who prefer clubhouse hijinks and handsome looks by the players to dirty uniforms, moving a runner over and stealing a base to start a ninth inning rally. The game of baseball, at least on the professional level, especially in Los Angeles, is dead. I attend college games from time to time to enjoy the more purist form of the game. There you see people keeping score, aware of every pitch, and players standing up for nine innings and rooting on their teammates. I never hear mention of Sabermetrics or Fangraphs predictions that never come true. For under $10 you can watch baseball as it was decades ago and if bored, can take a long walk in the sun on a college campus and not feel you were ripped off. No overpriced tickets, concessions and escalated parking fees.

The Dodgers are in a sad state. There is constant promise that better days are ahead, a return to greatness. We have yet to see it. Save for a fluke in 1988, the greatness stopped after the 1981 World Series win vs. the New York Yankees. Now we have a brain trust of egos running the show for a huge financial corporation, a small market mentality of going cheap with marginal back up players and career minor leaguers, while spending hundreds of millions on unproven or injured players. A bi-polar approach to baseball that supposedly, per head genius Andrew Friedman, should bear fruit in 2018 – ironically the year Clayton Kershaw can opt out of his contract, and will. But what of 2016 and 2017? Fans are being told to come to the games and pay top dollar for a team not prepared to win, since they can’t watch the games on TV anyway. You would think this would upset long-suffering fans, but no. If you point out to them that they should be angry, they turn on you instead. Rooting for laundry, and corporate success, means more than their own selfish goals of seeing their team hoist the World Series trophy, it seems.

So if everything goes according to plan, Guggenheim will make huge profits the next two years with a packed full stadium, and fans can watch their greatest pitcher leave, but in return see a low payroll team of kids competing in 2018. No, this isn’t Tampa, or Milwaukee, or Kansas City – it’s Los Angeles, the second largest market in the country. If all goes well, the team will be full of young players in 2018, the expensive stars all gone, replaced by expensive unproven Cuban and injury-marred players. This is the plan, this is what fans will have to look forward to. If you dare mention this sounds odd, you will be attacked. The Internet bullies will be out in force, telling you why you are wrong, to trust slick talking executives whose pedigrees don’t necessarily merit such trust, as they root on lesser talent to look smart. Meantime, as it always goes, better constructed teams, with top talent, keep winning the titles.

One wonders how long it will take before anyone changes their mind? Will it have to be four decades of mediocrity? Five? Six? If you point this out, they will say, you’re part of the problem. Keep the faith, never question anything, fork over your money, and poo on you if you think “old-time baseball” methods would work in the modern era. You’re a fool if you believe good players should be on the field, or games on TV for fans to enjoy. Remember, if the top does well, it will trickle down to the rest of us. Except when it doesn’t. And it never does. Play ball!

Just a Super Bowl Away…

February 5, 2016 5 comments

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Super Bowl is almost here and that’s great because it puts to bed the NFL and opens the door on MLB spring training.

The Dodgers fans are hopeful because Andrew Friedman keeps adding to his All-Star executive staff. The fans who root for this are the same folks who believe in trickle-down economics and tax breaks for the uber rich. I don’t get this line of thinking at all, but if I say anything, I’m called out as an idiot and someone who just doesn’t grasp the genius of fat cats getting fatter at thin cats expense.

The additions of Greg Maddux and Raul Ibanez are nice, but it would be better if they were as pitching coach and hitting coach. I love both of the former players so have no problem with their being added – just wondering how many geniuses it takes to consider things like leadoff hitter, bullpen and healthy starting pitchers. I also wonder if you have Maddux and Ibanez, two smart former players and stars, why you need Gabe Kapler? Perhaps his job is to flex his rock hard body to keep Friedman and Farhan Zaidi happy, and hey, not that there’s anything wrong with that. Don’t forget Ned the often maligned and bald eagle Stan Kasten are still on the payroll. And Alex A, the genius of last year’s Toronto Blue Jays. What a staff! In all honesty, the executive suite is deeper and better than the starting rotation, bullpen and everyday lineup. However did Fred Claire win a title in 1988 by himself, with input from scouts about Eck’s backdoor slider? Or how did “stupid Ned” get the team to back to back championship series? Boggles the mind.

The re-signing of Howie Kendrick was a welcome one and transformed a mediocre lineup into something halfway respectable. His reappearance solidified an infield that was going to be a black hole at second, a rookie at short and a utility man with bum knees at third. Now realistically all the lineup needs is a leadoff man – calling Dexter Fowler, please report to the Dodgers leadoff spot immediately. Don’t like that? A brilliant (I thought) observation by the Dodger Oracle (@TheDodgerOracle) was that perhaps the gang of suits in the front office ship “born again” Yasiel Puig to the Yankees for Brett Gardner and Andrew Miller. Of course it might take a good prospect to do so, but it would be worthwhile. A leadoff man the Moneyballers could embrace (Gardner hits homers, arguably more than Puig could anyway) and they add a bullpen stud to set up Kenley Jansen, replace him if he’s hurt, or when he walks as a free-agent this winter. The point is, if they added a lead-off presence, the lineup would be pretty set.

The improvement of the lineup has gotten all the talk recently and taken away focus from the so-so rotation and pen. I think it’s optimistic to think the Dodgers can do well in the National League with what they have now. The only chance they will win the West is if the improved Giants and Diamondbacks hand it to them, or if rookies like Julio Urias and Corey Seager step up in ways one shouldn’t count on from baby players. i.e. it’s possible, but unlikely the Dodgers will repeat as Western Division champs or even make the playoffs.

Two weeks from pitchers and catchers reporting, and a bloated Super Bowl spectacle standing in the way. Enjoy your pre-spring training and think happy thoughts. Don’t be mad if fans have other ideas than you; it’s healthy. And rooting on the top isn’t good unless you actually benefit from doing so. I have not seen anything from the Dodgers front office to believe they are capable of turning a 30-year drought into a Kansas City type situation. Maybe a few more big names to the think tank will change all that.

When it Comes to Pete, MLB’s “Integrity of the Game” Argument is Bullshit

March 19, 2015 1 comment

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Once again the Pete Rose Hall of Fame topic has raised its dirty face. I drive along, tuned into MLB Network Radio, and listen to the hosts – usually company men, shills for the organization – and callers, rant about how Pete knew what he was doing, committed the Cardinal Sin of baseball and therefore should not ever be allowed into the hallowed halls of Cooperstown.

Sometimes I feel compelled to call in, but think better of it. What’s the use? Argue with a host that already has pat answers, refer to calls from raving mental patients? There’s better ways to spend one’s time; so I flip the station to something else and continue on my merry way.

The reason, however, I think Pete deserves to be in the Hall is pretty basic. The argument for anyone saying he shouldn’t be in is that he bet on baseball, so the integrity of the games – the most sacred of sacreds – is on the line. After all, if the outcome might be affected – such as the Black Sox scandal of yore – who gives a crap about baseball?

I would facetiously argue that “reality TV” is drawing pretty well, as does professional wrestling, and perhaps other fixed sports such as boxing, the NBA and NFL (no proof on the latter, but it’s always fishy the way things go down, especially when the games matter). This is my light, cynical reasoning, but the biggest reason I would argue on Pete’s behalf is what integrity of the game?

Pete’s gambling occurred as a manager, so his playing days might be considered separate altogether. Apparently they’re not, so lumped together, Pete is seen as a gambler who while there’s no proof he affected games at all, may have had some hand in outcomes. Anyone who understands Pete knows he is such a competitor it’s completely unreasonable to assume he threw games. That leaves potentially damaging pitchers’ arms to ensure winning them. Well, there’s no proof of that, and in a country that maintains proof to convict, it’s a bit sketchy at best.

The only thing that matters to me though is that assuming Pete affected games’ outcomes, or not, and just placed bets on his team to win, is that more of an affront to the integrity of the game than Bud Selig either incompetently allowing big leaguers to rewrite the (just as sacred) big league record book by not knowing their “too good to be true” numbers were chemically enhanced, or perhaps more obvious – happy it was going on?

Either way the “integrity” aspect was and continues to be shot to hell to me. Baseball – from Bud on to broadcasters, managers, players and fans, were and are involved in deception. The numbers were heavily padded for an entire era, and continue to be padded. PED cheats still pop up, many are allowed to cash in on the next large contract, and younger stars are passed off as the next Mantle, Mays and Aaron. Until they’re caught – if they’re caught.

Players bulking up to the size of NFL linebackers and being judged not on baseball skills but “tools” – earning contracts through football-style combines where they pull or push cars, lift weights, drag cement blocks, etc., as opposed to traditional baseball skills.

Bud is gone, but it’s yet to be determined how different the new commish, Rob Manfred, is. After all, MLB wants viewers, wants asses in the seats and knows it must compete with the NBA and NFL for those who require superhuman achievements and action – action – and more action! The modern fan is deficient of mental skills required to appreciate what makes baseball the best game, and what put it atop all other sports and called the National Pastime. The time of a game was never in question as fans understood the nuances of the “game”, not necessarily the “sport.”

Today we are supposed to buy massive bodybuilder type players gaining weight over the few month off-season and when an older player improves in his advanced years, hitting everything in sight in a red hot post-season run, we’re supposed to assume it’s legit. We know in the very recent past the players were all doped up and cheating, but now – well, it’s different. It is, it really is!

Then some busts happen or someone is outed and we’re told it’s an isolated incident, not to worry. The commish will handle it. Whatever – it’s an insult to fans’ intelligence and speaks volumes to me that there is very little “integrity” left in the game. If the 100+ year record book is peppered with trickery, why do we draw a line in the sand where baseball’s all-time hit king can’t cross?

All I know is Pete played the game like all of us would want any player on our town’s team to play the game. When Steve Sax came up from AA ball to play second for the Dodgers, it was like watching our own blue Pete Rose. He ran to first base when he walked, he hustled non-stop – it was fun, it was energy. Pete played that way every game of a very long career. He amassed, legitimately, more hits than anyone who ever played the game. If sportswriters mull over whether Bonds, Clemens, A-Rod, Palmiero, Big Mac, Piazza, Sosa, etc. – even nice guy Andy Pettitte – deserve to be in the Hall – eventually – then Pete should get that level of respect. More. Pete didn’t do anything unethical as a player – unless you count overly enthusiastically bowling over a catcher in the All-Star game.

Yet I see many baseball writers in my Twitter feed saying they voted for PED-era users or suspects and feel they should be in. I will say Bud and MLB created a very messy problem for the writers to figure out. In reality, if Pete is not allowed to be in the Hall, none of the PED users should either. And I would argue perhaps even if Pete is allowed in, the PED users shouldn’t (plenty of old-timers they could allow in first – Gil Hodges, for one). What the dopers did was affect outcomes of games and took away a large part of the mystique of baseball’s record book. No other sport considers its record book as gospel as much as baseball – a game built on its past and its statistics. Pete gambled, but he didn’t do it as a player, and there’s no proof his gambling affected games. We KNOW all those extra home runs, RBI and pitching accomplishments did.

I don’t get the dislike of Pete. I see him in interviews and he seems very genuine in his lifelong love of baseball and regrets what he did. Some punishments cannot be lifted – this I get – but it seems once Bud touted “Chicks Love the Long Ball” as MLB’s post-strike mantra and advertising campaign, all bets were off the table. There has been no “integrity” so to speak in over 20 years. No one can look at Mike Trout, Bryce Harper, Papi, Yasiel Puig, etc., etc. and know for sure that what they’re doing, that seems so incredible, is in fact all-natural. That is the legacy of Bud and why the game’s morals are damaged.

I don’t see the talking heads on MLB Network Radio or the TV side, MLB Network, or during games, on the radio, in columns, etc., saying this. Baseball writers, ex-jocks and pundits don’t want to be the one caught calling out the game or the commish. They don’t want to be blackballed – like that reporter in San Francisco was when he went after Melky Cabrera – and they certainly don’t want to lose access to the locker room, or free food. So they talk up the incredible achievements happening on the field and never do their duty as reporters and ask – “Do we know for sure that this is real?”

I am suspicious immediately when anything looks too good to be true. The old adage is that if it looks too good to be true, it usually is. We certainly learned Bud’s heralded home run chase of Roger Maris by pumped up buddies Big Mac and Sammy Sosa was. The aging Roger Clemens pitching as good as he did when he was a young man, etc., etc. Baseball has a past steeped in dirty behavior – racists, drunks, abusers, drug addicts, etc. In that way, unfortunately, it is like any walk of American life. The Hall is full of bad eggs, but as MLB Network Radio hosts says, what Pete did goes beyond being a bad boy – he made us call into question the scores themselves. Ok, if that’s true (again, no proof that it is), how are Bonds fantastic accomplishments at age 40, Clemens, and all those hits, homers and RBI by the rest of them any less? You’re going to tell me that in those record-breaking stats, no achievement directly affected the outcome of a game? There was no walk-off homer, no 15 K pitching win, no 4-5 RBI night that helped a team win? Please… it’s offensive to anyone with a brain in their head.

Baseball and the writers not having the balls to bring any of this up are sickening. Listening to them continue to paint Pete as something akin to a Nazi because he bet on games as a manager is pathetic. I don’t know how the old or new commish sleep at night, nor the guys who know more than they’ll ever tell. Managers, former and current players, announcers, beat reporters, etc.

There is no baseball Hall of Fame without the all-time hit leader in it. And if you’re going to ban him from having a plaque next to violent racists and other offenders, fine, just don’t ever cast a vote – or even put on the ballot – a whole generation of players we know either did performance enhancing drugs, or whose numbers suggest they likely did. They do not belong as they hurt the “integrity” of the game. As a fan, I find this inexcusable – but more than just blame the players, who wanted accolades and tens of millions of dollars – I point the finger at those who allowed, and even promoted, their offenses.

In the end, Pete deserves to be a Hall of Famer – with a comment or two on his plaque how after he retired, he admitted to gambling on baseball when he managed. I am not sure it will ever happen, or most certainly not sure it will happen in his life – which is just sad. On a bright note, Pete won on the field and continues to win in life. Kiana Kim? Once more – please – the man is a genius. And certainly the textbook description of how a person is supposed to play the game of baseball.

Another con job foisted upon gullible Dodgers fans

March 14, 2015 Leave a comment

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Spring training 2015 is halfway over, or halfway started, depending on your level of optimism. This is a weird spring training in a weird time period overall for long-suffering Dodgers fans. I don’t know about you, but it’s hard to feel excited about this team anymore. I can’t accumulate whatever body chemistry I would require to feel warm and fuzzy, nostalgic, or even connected to the Dodgers. Right now I follow out of a dual sense of inquisitiveness and obligation. After all, I have followed the Dodgers religiously since I was a young kid. Now, it’s a very different time and I’m reminded by overly aggressive narcissists online that being older than 25 means I may as well dig my own grave, hop in, and somehow pull the dirt on top of me. This is the time, of course, for young ideas – good ones too, such as using every form of social media available, texting while driving, urinating, shitting, talking to friends, in line, out of line, in bed, etc., etc. Watching bad reality programming, listening to sound-alike pop music, dressing the same as everybody else, getting the same tattoos, cultivating the same facial scruff, or full beards, and buying the same black frame eyeglasses. Of course this translates into following whatever is sold in general, not just in a social media, TV, music or fashion sense. It’s easier to navigate life if somebody else tells you what to do and think, and that bleeds into sports interests. Baseball has become a safe haven for these sorts of people, as yesterday’s fantasy baseball nerds have grown up (sort of) and become today’s shapers of teams. The Dodgers, lucky for us, have a half dozen or so of these guys, happy to explain just what to think and feel and how to take selfies, vape and go with the flow – as long as we buy tickets at the gate. Since I don’t plan to buy tickets at the gate, and because I’ve never been much of a conformist (surprising, I know), I’m irrelevant to the Guggenheim owned Dodgers. All it matters is butts in the seat, and concessions and merch from the stands throughout the stadium.

To make the experience easy for the cookie cutter followers, Andrew Friedman and his team were hired to use their superior intellects to craft a team just for you. Notice how there is no mention of why Stan Kasten was brought in – a pedigree of winning (just not World Series) in Atlanta – and subsequently his plan, whatever it was, has already been scrapped. There’s no talk of why his snapping up Cubans like Alex Guerrero and Erisbel Arruebarrena must not have worked because Friedman and Friends (trademark) have already given up on them in favor of their own Cubans, such as injury risk Hector Oliveras. It’s also interesting that after collecting nearly $9B for a new TV deal, the Guggenheim company (who shelled out $2B to get the almost $9B, proving they are very smart when it comes to making money) has been absent from all things Dodgers. Recall, if you can, how the Dreamworks-like Guggenheim multi-millionaires paraded endlessly before the media in LA proclaiming the Dodgers way was back. I don’t see this anymore, nor do I see any end in sight to the TV deal limitation that means most people in the city cannot watch the team they grew up loving. I don’t see “owner” Magic Johnson smiling and wearing a blue hat, nor do I notice him (his intern) tweeting about all things Dodgers. This is clearly a case of having taken the money and ran. Magic, no doubt, along with his friends in the ownership circle, have retreated to their Italian vacation spots early this year, leaving us to whip up faux excitement over the data guys’ roster plans. Lucky for Guggenheim, the checks are clearing and most fans are easily seduced by the snake oil Friedman and Friends are peddling.

I have no idea how this 2015 edition of the guys wearing Dodgers uniforms will perform, and neither do you. You can argue that the data gang knows more than I do and that they were right to pay many players large amounts of money to perform in other cities, some the Dodgers division rivals. You might say it was very astute to deal Dee Gordon at the height of his value or that all the accumulated injury risks the Friedman and Friends group is “buying low” on (in many cases, however, spending more than market value) may pay off. You could follow their notion that a poor defending, PED-using catcher is just the weapon the team needs, or that turning an overly crowded outfield situation into a slightly less crowded one, and moving the excess into the infield picture is a thing of art. You may be right at the end of the season, or not. I’ve seen such bravado practiced years ago when Billy Beane’s sidekick rode into town and dismantled a surging, baseball savvy group in favor of a more Moneyball friendly package. The roster put forward at that time was not unlike the scab team the Dodgers fielded during the last strike. I would argue the replacement team was better.

I’ll just leave it at this seems an awful lot, coming from a person who’s seen a lot (I know that offends many of you younger, or trying to be young), that the slow bleed that’s transpired more or less since the end of the 70s glory days – marked by that wonderful 1981 win over the hated NY Yankees – is still very much with us. There have been moments, as some of you will no doubt point to. 1988, Finley’s home run, Lima-time, back to back NLCS appearances, Kershaw, the bubble machine, Kemp’s ass, etc. I would say most of that is a mirage and the decay has been forming since that great 70s-1981 team was disbanded. O’Malley’s disinterest once his NFL dreams were squashed, the farm’s drying up, the sale to Fox, Bud Selig handing the Dodgers to McCourt, the invasion of thugs into the stadium, beatings, violence, lawsuits, bankruptcy, then promise of greatness by LA’s own icon, Magic Johnson, only to see the team abandoned by not only the white hat wearing Guggenheim fat cats, but without TV coverage for most of the people in the city. None of it matters to those who like to feel superior by taking American capitalism to heart, siding with the uber rich, not questioning authority, etc. It has been 34 years now since 1981. Even if you want to fool yourselves and pretend the last bit of greatness was 1988 (you missed the teams between that time, which makes sense as you weren’t born yet), it’s 27 years. I stick with 34 as my number, but if it makes you sleep better, you can go with 27.

As a person who questions the status quo, I am an enemy of many of you. It’s odd that cynical younger people are more apt to buy the bullshit big corporations and data nerds throw at you. All I know, as an older fan, it’s offensive to me to have seen – now, listened, since seeing Dodgers baseball in LA is nearly impossible – Vin Scully spend such a long time smiling and going along with whatever swill the front offices, past and present, have made him swallow. Oh to be a Scully insider – a family member, or a good friend. Knowing what I do of the man from his persona, I doubt he has liked the direction his once great baseball team has gone. I was heartbroken when freshly scrubbed and powdered Frank McCourt used to visit Vin in the booth and chat, and Vin would ensure all of us what a great man the owner was. From the moment he slithered into town and was handed the keys to the kingdom without any money on paper, I knew we were fucked. The subsequent destruction of tradition, even to the extent of bouncing checks to Vin, was not surprising to me. As Adrian Monk used to say on his TV show, my ability to see through utter bullshit within nanoseconds is both “a blessing and a curse.” I am right much, much more than I am wrong. I called the weaknesses in the Dodgers’ bullpen the past several years, noted the madcap escapades of certain Dodgers were bad for team chemistry, and I know I am right about this situation.

I will get snarky responses, as I often do, from those who are young, entitled and feel they know more than everybody else, either because their parents told them as much, or their friends at Starbucks did. I wish you all the very best. You have every right to your opinion, but siding with multi-millionaires and corporate jackoffs is not the way I operate, so we agree to disagree. Only time will tell what the 2015 Dodgers are capable of. I don’t know, and neither do you. I do know that the way fans have been treated for a good amount of the past 34 years is utter bullshit, and anyone who doesn’t see that needs to put down the iPhone, turn off the repetitive drone of similar sounding pop songs, and perhaps pull your head out of your ass. He made be old – like me – but Vin Scully certainly deserves a better last chapter than this.